In Practical Spanish, Spanish Lessons

Spanish Idioms Related to Food

 

Every language has their own expressions and idioms unique to the culture. Many are the same across languages, some change a few words, and some completely change the expression.

Enjoy this list of 10 popular Spanish idioms with food. Use them to practice your Spanish and gain some insight into the Spanish culture.

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Spanish Vocab – Food

1 – chorizo
Spanish head cabeza
2 – pan
Spanish_Mouth_Boca
3 – pera
Spanish_Face_Cara

4 – carne
Spanish_Hand_Mano
5– uva
Spanish_Elbows_Codos
6– leche
Spanish_Neck_Cuello

7 – fideo
Spanish_Nose_Narice
8 – sopa
Spanish_Toes_Pies
9 – pimiento
Spanish_Eye_Ojo

10 – ostras
Spanish_Eye_Ojo

Spanish Idioms with Food

 

# Spanish English (Literal) English (Translation)
1 Ser un chorizo
To be a chorizo (sausage) To be a thief
2 Ser pan comido
To be eaten bread Easy as pie
3 Ser el añol de la pera
To be the year of the pear To be out of fashion
4 Ser carne de cañón To be meat from the cannon Fish bate; To be thrown under the bus
5 Estar de mala uva
To be bad grapes To be grumpy, in a bad mood
6 Tener mala leche
To have bad milk To have a bad temper
7 Estar como un fideo
To be like a noodle Thin as a rail
8 Estar como una sopa
To be like a soup To be soaked to the bone
9 Importar un pimiento
To matter a pepper Doesn’t matter / To give a crap
10 ¡Ostras!
Oysters! Holy moley!

 

For example:

 

SER UN CHORIZO

Los políticos son unos chorizos
Politicians are thieves

SER PAN COMIDA

Este ejercicio es pan comido, puedo hacerlo en cinco minutos
This exercise is easy as pie, I can do it in five minutes

SER DEL AÑO DE LA PERA

Ese vestido es del año de la pera. Mi madre lo llevaba cuando era joven
This dress is so out of fashion, my mother wore it when she was young

SER CARNE DE CAÑÓN

Los más inteligentes siempre son carne de cañón. Es fácil echarles la culpa
The most intelligent people are always thrown under the bus.  It is easy to throw the blame on them

ESTAR DE MALA UVA

Hoy es mejor no hablar con el jefe, está de mala uva
Today it is better not to talk to the boss, he’s in a bad mood

TENER MALA LECHE

Mi esposa tiene muy mala leche. Ella siempre está gritando
My wife has a bad temper. She is always shouting

ESTAR COMO UN FIDEO

Raquel está como un fideo. Ha estado un mes a dieta
Raquel is like a noodle. She has been on a diet a month

ESTAR COMO UNA SOPA

Ayer llovía muchísimo y llegué a casa como una sopa
Yesterday it rained a lot and I arrived home soaked to the bone

IMPORTA UN PIMIENTO

Me importa un pimiento si vienes o no
It doesn’t matter to me if you come or not

¡OSTRAS!

¡Ostras! ¡Cuánta gente hay aqui!
Holy moly! How many people there are here!

 

A note about ‘mala leche’ y ‘mala uva’

 

These two expressions are synonymous and can often be used interchangeably.

But note the difference between whether they are used with ‘estar‘ or ‘tener‘.

ESTAR: When used with ‘estar‘ we speak of a temporary state, as in being in a bad mood.

TENER: When used with ‘tener‘ we speak more to the character of someone, like having a bad temper.

 

Tener mala leche / Tener mala uva = (tener mal carácter) = to have a bad temper
Estar de mala leche / Estar de mala uva = (estar de mal humor) = to be in a bad mood

 

no seas mala leche  Spanish expression

 

 

Your turn!

Use the idioms in a comment below and we’ll correct any mistakes for you. Or, can you think of other English equivalents for these idioms? Share in the comments.

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Showing 2 comments
  • Anna

    Estar como un queso: (literal translation: to be like a cheese) Real tranlation: to be hot (very attractive)
    No está el horno para bollos (literal translation: the oven is not for buns) Real translation: it’s not the right moment, bad timing.

  • vickie helms

    Si no quieres estar de mala uva trates de comer a tiempo.

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